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NEWS

October 1, 2019

An image from the protocol paper Isolation and Immunofluorescent Staining of Fresh Rat Pia-Arachnoid Complex Tissue for Mechanical Characterization was featured on the cover of the journal Current Protocols in Neuroscience Volume 89, Issue 1. Current Protocols in Neuroscience is the comprehensive methodology resource for neuroscience research, focusing on protocols ranging from molecular pathways to synaptic transmission, behavioral techniques to imaging modalities. Find the article here: https://doi.org/10.1002/cpns.83 

July 2, 2019

Xenith comprises independent experts in athlete health and wellness, neurology, biomechanics, and sport technology. The inaugural advisory board is responsible for contributing to product development through scientific research and offering clinical perspectives. Additionally, board members advise Xenith team on state-of-the-art athlete care and pertinent scientific developments in athlete health and performance. 

March 21, 2019

Kurtlab was awarded an R21 grant by the National Institute of Health (NIH) to study Chiari malformation type I (CM1), a pathology characterized by structural defects in the cerebellum, through amplified MRI. Continued development of this method paves the way for earlier diagnosis and intervention of brain pathologies such as TBI, hydrocephalus, Alzheimer's disease, and other neurodegenerative diseases. 

To learn more, check out: Amplified MRI (aMRI): A novel way to investigate the pathophysiology ...grantome.com/grant/NIH/R21-NS111415-01

November 8, 2018

The novel MRI imaging technique called aMRI (amplified MRI) has been recognized in the Vizzies Visualization Challenge and awarded the meritorious Peoples' Choice Award. This technique which was developed by Kurtlab, in collaboration with Stanford University and the University of Auckland (New Zealand), elucidates the hidden motions of the brain tissues following periodic blood pressure variations. Not only does this technique enable the visualization of once-imperceptible motions, but it also offers insight into the brain's mechanical properties and how it moves in relation to its respective blood circulation. 

Collaborators: John Martinez, Itamar Terem, Kambiz Nael, Samantha Holdsworth 

Check it out: https://www.nsf.gov/news/special_reports/scivis/vizzies_winners_2018.jsp

August 7, 2018

We are delighted to announce that Kurtlab was awarded $275,000 by National Science Foundation CMMI Dynamics, Control and System Diagnostics program to investigate the mechanics of bio-interfaces by shear wave scattering through a synergy of theoretical and experimental approaches. Further information about the grant can be found at the webpage:

https://www.nsf.gov/awardsearch/showAward?AWD_ID=1826270&HistoricalAwards=false

May 30, 2018

The study led by Samantha Holdsworth (Professor at the University of Auckland) and Itamar Terem (visiting student at Stanford University) where Dr. Kurt is a co-author has caught media attention. The stunning aMRI video (prepared by I. Terem) showing the amplified motion of the brain upon heart pulsatility has caught the attention of various media outlets, including The Daily Mail, Medical Xpress.

You can read the original publication here

April 4, 2018

Dr. Kurt's PRL paper made the international news by featuring in the "Deutsches Ärzteblatt", one of the main medical journals in Germany reaching around 370000 doctors weekly. 

If you're not scared of German, you can read the whole story here!

April 1, 2018

Dr. Kurt's work with smart airbag helmets was discussed in his interview with WCBS. You can read and listen to the whole interview here. Go Kurtlab!

March 30, 2018

Dr. Kurt's paper "Mechanistic Insights into Human Brain Impact Dynamics through Modal Analysis", recently published on Physical Review Letters, featured in Science Magazine

The study analyzed data on 189 head collisions acquired during football games (thanks to special mouth guards equipped with accelerometers and gyroscopes) and simulated how the brain responded mechanically to each hit. This allowed to identify the most important frequencies of brain oscillations during the impacts, with profound implications for the understanding of concussion mechanisms and the design of protective helmets.

You can read a commentary on the study written by Prof. P. Bayly (Washington University, St. Louis) for the American Physical Society’s website here

Congratulations Dr. Kurt!

January 15, 2018

Our lab's work on concussion recently featured on the main Stevens' website: among others, Dr. Kurt explains why measuring the brain’s mechanical properties in vivo could give us new hints on brain function and pathology. Find the full story at https://www.stevens.edu/news/concussions.

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